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Dr. Tim Hare honored for textbook chapter contribution

by admin last modified 2007-02-28 15:02

Morehead, KY. -Jan 29, 2007- Dr. Tim Hare, Assistant Professor of Anthropology for the Institute for Regional Analysis and Public Policy (IRAPP), at Morehead State University, has been honored in the January 2007 issue of Choice Magazine published by the Association of College and Research Libraries for his chapter titled, Postclassic Maya Society Regenerated at Mayapán in the textbook After Collapse: The Regeneration of Complex Societies.

Dr. Tim HareThis year’s Outstanding Academic Titles list include 640 books and electronic resources chosen from among 6,816 chapter titles reviewed by Choice Magazine editorial staff.

“These titles have been selected for their excellence in scholarship and presentation, the significance of their contribution to the field, and their value as important often the first treatment of their subject,” announced the editorial staff.

The editors also praised Hare’s chapter as, “Truly the best of the best, and as always, only a select group of publishers and authors are represented on such a list.”

Hare, shares a dual appointment with the department of Geography, Government and History and IRAPP, and teaches cultural anthropology, GIS applications, and economic geography.

He conducts research in healthcare and heart-related disease in Kentucky, and spatial and social organization of Postclassic Maya societies. Most recently Hare published an article in the Journal of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, “Captive Olive Baboon Maternal Time Budgets and GIS Technology.”

Hare also presented a paper at the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association Conference on, “Space-time Patterns of Mortality and Related Factors, Central Appalachia 1968-2002.”

“The book and the article examine the way societies around the world have dealt with social collapse,” says Hare. “While the collapse of societies, such as the ancient Maya, Greek, and Khmer, has been explored intensely; the processes by which societies recover and rebuilt have received little study,” he added.

Hare’s chapter examines archaeological excavation and survey at the last Mayan imperial capital to shed light on the resurgence of Maya society after the Classic period collapse

More information on  this article can be found in the Choice Magazine 2007 issue published by the Association of College and Research Libraries and information on the Institute for Regional Analysis and Public Policy can be found in the website: http://www.moreheadstate.edu/irapp  or by calling Dr. Dave Rudy at  606-783-5419.

 
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